March 05, 2012

Pull-up Bar Options

I spent many moments researching the options for pull-up bars over the last few weeks, and I decided to share them.


The following are excellent choices, each with their own pros and cons, depending on your living situation and what/how you plan to use the bar.


www.trapezerigging.com
Trapeze Rigging makes trapeze equipment.  They manufacture a light-weight, portable pull-up bar made of aluminum.  This bar costs between $200 and $350 depending on the model you choose.  The major complaint for this bar is that it's slightly rickety. On the other hand, you can easily transport this bar to the park or beach for your workouts. 


www.studbarpullup.com
The Stud bar is extremely popular.  It's fairly inexpensive, about $150, and installs in your ceiling studs.  Fans of this bar praise the space conscious design, the excellent stability, and the good quality.  


http://tacticalathlete.com
Known as the T.A.P.S bar, this is the fancy Cadillac bar.  The T.A.P.S is a solid, stand alone, heavy duty, bar.  It is taller than the Trapeze Rigging bar, and is designed to stay primarily in one space.  This bar is popular with people who have minor space considerations, and need a heavy duty, stand alone bar.  The T.A.P.S costs $450, plus shipping.


If you plan to use your pull-up bar/system for other exercises, you should look at the various power racks and cages on the market.  They are heavy duty and may be used for a variety of cross-fit workouts.  Power racks and cages will run you about $500.  If you must have a power rack but cannot afford a new one, check Craigslist.  I found one seller in San Diego who was willing to sell his for $200. 


After all these hours reading websites, I ultimately decided on the Perfect Fitness brand doorway bar, which is seated in the door frame.  The bar sits a bit low, but all I have to do is bend my knees from the dead hang position.  This bar costs $30,  is extremely simple to assemble, and is well constructed.  Beyond the price this bar brings a certain psychological element, which I touched on in yesterday's post.  "Ellie,"  (I named it) is hanging in our hall closet right now, so every time I pass her, she gets at least one pull-up, two or three ideally.  I have done 10 pull-ups today using this system.


If you choose this mind-jacking route to improve your pull-ups, be sure to take a few seconds to hang and stretch your arms before knocking out the exercise.  I am taking a no-holds barred approach to this task, so I love that Ellie is right there staring me down in the eyes while I saunter down the hall with a handful of laundry.     


Train well all,
Dag 



2 comments:

  1. I'd quite like a pull up bar, but I'd be worried it would make this rickety old Victorian terraced house fall apart. It was built in 1895, so I'm not sure how it would feel about people hanging off the door frames (although I am at least small).

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  2. I bought the TAPS pull up bar in 2005. I stored the bar in my garage, used mainly bodyweight exercises on it (I weigh around 196 lbs), and took care of it yet around 3 weeks ago I was cranking out some pull ups when the threaded inserts (where the bolts screw in to hold the bar upright) in both legs tore out and the entire bar bent at a 70 degree angle. Since then I have e-mailed both customer service and Jeff Martone and to my disappointment neither have replied. I was not surprised that customer service did not reply (after all there is no warranty or refunds) but I was a little disappointed that Mr. Martone did not write back. After all this is a man who quotes the Bible and praises God in his articles. In summary, I highly recommend that you do not spend $500 (bar plus shipping) on this 'indestructable' pull up bar. I now use a $55 doorway pull up (that I bought from NewYork Barbell) and am quite happy with it. Sincerely,
    S.Chin

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